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Chemical Biology

A supplement providing a snapshot of the latest developments in chemical biology



Chip technology for protein detection


20 February 2006

"Peptide microarrays with the dry format are expected to be one of the high-throughput and robust technologies for direct analyses of protein-binding, functions, interactions and networks"
- Hisakazu Mihara, Tokyo Institute of Technology
A microarray system that can be used to detect and analyse proteins has been developed by researchers in Japan. 

Hisakazu Mihara at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, and colleagues have created a protein detection system using an array of specially designed peptides. When a protein is added to the array, each peptide spot shows a fluorescent response that depends on its sequence. The patterns of these responses are used to identify the proteins.

The system's main advantage is the use of dry, rather than the more usual wet, peptide samples. The system is easy to use on a nanolitre scale, making it suitable for high-throughput analyses. The format may even be suitable for use in novel protein-detecting chips, said Mihara.

Mihara commented that this new technology will see biomedicine and molecular biology put to use in diagnostic and drug discovery applications. 'Peptide microarrays with the dry format are expected to be one of the high-throughput and robust technologies for direct analyses of protein-binding, functions, interactions and networks,' he said. 

Jenna Wilson

References

K Usui et al, Mol. BioSyst., 2006, 2, 113 (DOI: 10.1039/b514263F)