Printing out new catalysts


An inkjet printer has been repurposed to create a huge library of potential catalysts. To make the technology work with inorganic reagents that have different chemistries, a collaboration between chemists at the University of California, Santa Barbara, US, and Zhejiang University in China, has created special 'inks' made of colloidal nanoparticles of different metal precursors and polymers that direct the formation of the resulting nanoparticle structures.

Different nanoparticle inks can then be loaded into seperate ink containers and combined in precise amounts, resulting in up to 1 million new formulations an hour, containing up to eight different components. That resulting library can then be explored for new catalysts. 


Related Content

3D printed graphene aerogels take shape

25 February 2016 Research

news image

Technique holds potential to fabricate ultra-light structures with architectures tailored for specific applications

Cosmetics deals push skin 3D bioprinting

24 September 2015 Business

news image

Interest for testing from L’Oréal, BASF and Procter & Gamble could be a stepping stone towards bespoke organs

Most Commented

Countries ink Paris climate change agreement

27 April 2016 News and Analysis

news image

Nearly 200 countries signed the global climate treaty that aims to limit temperature rises to ‘well below’ 2°C

Shadow of Chernobyl

26 April 2016 Critical Point

news image

Mark Peplow takes the long view on the cost of nuclear power