Mango and Zara sign up to 'detox' plan


Greenpeace has won more support for its campaign to remove potentially harmful chemicals from the supply chain of the global fashion industry.

Most recently, Spanish clothing company Mango has bowed to pressure, committing to remove any traces of perfluorinated carbon compounds from its products by 1 July 2013.

‘Mango is committed to zero discharges of all hazardous chemicals from the whole lifecycle and all production procedures that are associated with the making and using of all products Mango sells by 1 January 2020,’ the company said in a statement.

In addition, it will begin to publish site-specific data about discharge of hazardous chemicals across its supply chain, starting with at least 10 Chinese sites by February 2013 and extending to five more Chinese sites and five sites from anywhere around the world by December 2013. The data will cover at least 11 ‘priority groups’ of hazardous chemicals.

The move follows the decision by Zara, another Spanish clothing firm, to sign up. Inditex, the parent company of Zara, will ask 20 suppliers to disclose pollution data by the end of March 2013 and 100 by the end of 2013.

Zara and Mango have become the eighth and ninth companies to announce support for the Greenpeace ‘detox’ campaign since its launch in December 2011.


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