EPA focuses on five chemicals


The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released for public comment draft risk assessments of five chemicals found in common household products.

These include: dichloromethane (DCM) and methyl pyrrolidone (or N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, abbreviated to NMP) in paint stripper products; trichloroethene (TCE) in spray-on protective coatings or when used as a degreaser; antimony trioxide (ATO) when used with halogenated flame retardants; and 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8,-hexamethylcyclopenta-[γ]-2-benzopyran (HHCB) when used as an odour compound in commercial and consumer products.

The draft assessments focus either on human health or ecological hazards for specific uses. The assessments of DCM, NMP and TCE indicate a potential concern for human health, while the assessments for ATO and HHCB indicate a low concern for ecological health.

In March 2012, the EPA identified 83 chemicals as candidates for review under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) ‘work plan’.


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