Five green chemical feedstock projects launched


The UK's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has announced £10.7 million, in combination with £1.1 million from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, to fund five projects to develop new bio-based feedstocks for the chemical industry.

The programmes involve consortia including the University of Bath, University College London, Imperial College London and Durham University and will look at how the feedstocks can be incorporated into current manufacturing processes.

In a statement, David Willetts, Minister for Universities and Science, welcomed the news adding that 'scientific research is crucial to the developing alternatives to fossil based resources. The need to develop new chemicals, that are both sustainable and viable in our manufacturing processes, is pressing. It also presents us with opportunities to use our world class research base to accelerate the pace of change and deliver scientific and economic impact.'


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