UK-India projects launched


To coincide with the prime minister’s visit to India, UK universities have announced a series of research partnerships and scholarships intended to boost the trade and education links between the UK and India.

David Cameron's trade delegation to India, which arrived in Mumbai on Monday, comprises over 100 representatives from commercial firms and universities. At an event at a Unilever site in Mumbai, the prime minister confirmed that there will be no limit on the number of student visas available for Indian students, nor any limit to their staying after study.

As part of a suite of scholarships and research links being announced during the visit, Cambridge University will announce that it is  to collaborate with the Non-Ferrous Technology Development Centre in Hyderabad and Nagpur University to research fuel cell technology and £11 million from the Indian government will establish a Centre for Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, a collaborative project between Cambridge University, India's National Centre for Biological Sciences, and the Institute for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine in Bangalore.


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