Organic photovoltaics: materials, device physics, and manufacturing technologies


Christoph Brabec, Ullrich Scherf, Vladimir Dyakonov
Wiley
2014 | 618pp | £150
ISBN: 9783527332250
Reviewed by Graeme Cooke

The study of organic photovoltaics (OPV) is now a mature sub-discipline of photovoltaics, and as a result this second edition of Organic photovoltaics is a timely update of the original edition published in 2008.

In this second edition, the editors and contributors have produced an excellent book that encompasses the key aspects of a rapidly expanding and exciting field. Like its predecessor, the second edition is organised into three parts: materials design, synthesis and properties; aspects of device physics; and processing technologies. However, this second edition is fully revised and extended, and provides a comprehensive overview of important recent developments in the field.

A notable feature of this book is that there is a good balance of contributions from academic and industrial researchers, which provides an overview that spans both the fundamental and applied aspects of the science and technology underpinning contemporary OPV.

In conclusion, although I feel that this book would have benefited from a preface to set the scene for this edition, I highly recommend this book to chemists, physicists and engineers with research interests in OPV. The organisation, content and clarity of the book make it an excellent introduction for researchers new to the field, and for those already active in the area, the text is an up-to-date reference source.

Purchase Organic Photovoltaics: Materials, Device Physics, and Manufacturing Technologies on Amazon.co.uk


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