Skip to main content

Rechargeable cell - the lead acid accumulator

Description

Some types of cell are rechargeable. These cells store electricity. The most common rechargeable cell is the lead-acid type, which is the basis of car batteries. This experiment illustrates the charging and discharging of a lead-acid cell.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
rechargeable-cell-the-lea...



Apparatus Chemicals

For one demonstration or each pair of students:

Eye protection

Beakers (100 or 150 cm3), 2

Low voltage DC supply (2 - 4 V), or suitable battery

Torch bulb (1.25 V), in holder

Crocodile clips, 2 – 4, as needed

Connecting leads, 2

Stopclock or watch

Dilute sulfuric acid, 0.5 M (IRRITANT), about 100 cm3

Lead foil electrodes (TOXIC, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT) (about 2 cm x 8 cm), 2 (Note 1)

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 






Some types of cell are rechargeable. These cells store electricity. The most common rechargeable cell is the lead-acid type, which is the basis of car batteries. This experiment illustrates the charging and discharging of a lead-acid cell.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology .