Skip to main content

Allotropes of sulfur

Description

In this experiment you can observe the effect of heating sulfur slowly from room temperature. Changes in colour and consistency as it melts and eventually reaches boiling point can be recorded.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
allotropes-of-sulfur



Apparatus Chemicals

The teacher will require:

Eye protection

Heat resistant gloves

Access to a fume cupboard

Flexicam or similar camera, digital microscope, digital projector and screen or other method of projecting images of small crystals to the class (as available)

Boiling tubes, 4 (Note 2)

Test-tube holders, 2

Test-tube rack

Stands and clamps, 2

Conical flask, 250 cm3

Cork, to fit conical flask

Beaker (250 cm3), 2

Beaker, 1 dm3 (Note 3)

Thermometer, 0 – 250 °C

Petri dishes or watchglasses, 4 (or more)

Bunsen burner, tripod and gauze or
 electric hotplates, 2 (optional, if available)

Heat resistant mats, 2

Filter paper, about 18 - 20 cm diameter

Spatula

Paper clips

Damp cloth (to extinguish small sulfur fires)

Sulfur, powdered roll, 100 g

Dimethylbenzene (xylene), (HARMFUL), 100 cm3

Cooking oil, 700 cm3

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 

 










Page last updated October 2015

In this experiment you can observe the effect of heating sulfur slowly from room temperature. Changes in colour and consistency as it melts and eventually reaches boiling point can be recorded.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.

The experiment is also part of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Continuing Professional Development course: Chemistry for non-specialists