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Titrating sodium hydroxide with hydrochloric acid

Description

In this experiment sodium hydroxide is neutralised with hydrochloric acid to produce the soluble salt sodium chloride in solution. This solution is then concentrated and crystallised to produce sodium chloride crystals.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
titrating-sodium-hydroxid...






Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

Each working group requires:

Burette (30 or 50 cm3) (Note 1)

Conical flask (100 cm3)

Beaker (100 cm3)

Pipette (20 or 25 cm3) with pipette filler

Stirring rod

Small (filter) funnel (about 4 cm diameter)

Burette stand and clamp (Note 2)

White tile (optional) (Note 3)

Bunsen burner

Tripod

Pipeclay triangle (Note 4)

Evaporating basin (at least 50 cm3 capacity)

Crystallising dish (Note 5)

Microscope or hand lens suitable for examining crystals in the crystallising dish

Access to:

Sodium hydroxide solution, 0.4 M (IRRITANT), about 100 cm3 in a labelled and stoppered bottle

Dilute hydrochloric acid, 0.4 M, about 100 cm3 in a labelled and stoppered bottle

Methyl orange indicator solution (or alternative) in small dropper bottle

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 












Page last updated October 2015

In this experiment sodium hydroxide is neutralised with hydrochloric acid to produce the soluble salt sodium chloride in solution. This solution is then concentrated and crystallised to produce sodium chloride crystals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.

The experiment is also part of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Continuing Professional Development course: Chemistry for non-specialists