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Reaction of zinc with iodine

Description

This experiment involves the synthesis of a metal salt by direct reaction of a metal and a non-metal. Zinc powder is added to a solution of iodine in ethanol. An exothermic redox reaction occurs, forming zinc iodide, which can be obtained by evaporating the solvent.

Type of Activity

:
demonstration, class practical

Audience

:
Teacher

Age Group

:
11 to 16 years

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
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Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

Each group (or demonstration) requires:

Test-tubes (100 x 16 mm), 3

Test-tube bung

Test-tube rack

Measuring cylinder (10 cm3)

Small filter funnel

Filter paper

Teat pipette

Thermometer (0–100 oC)

Spatula

Watch glass

Weighing boat or suitable container for zinc powder

For the extension work:

Beaker (100 cm3)

Pair of graphite electrodes mounted in a rubber bung

Electrical leads and crocodile clips

Source of 3–6 V DC, either battery or power supply

Torch bulb in a suitable holder

Spatula

Chemicals are for one demonstration or one group of students:

Iodine (HARMFUL), about 0.5 g (Note 1)

Zinc powder (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE), about 0.5 g (Note 2)

Ethanol (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE) or IDA (Industrial Denatured Alcohol) (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, HARMFUL) about 5 cm3

For the extension work:

Distilled water, about 20 cm3

Dilute hydrochloric acid, 1 M or sulfuric acid, 1 M (IRRITANT), about 20 cm3

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 







This experiment involves the synthesis of a metal salt by direct reaction of a metal and a non-metal. Zinc powder is added to a solution of iodine in ethanol. An exothermic redox reaction occurs, forming zinc iodide, which can be obtained by evaporating the solvent.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.

The experiment is also part of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Continuing Professional Development course: Chemistry for non-specialists