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The greenhouse effect

Description

The demonstration is in two parts. In the first, the greenhouse effect in a greenhouse is modelled using transparent bottles containing air. In the second part, the role of carbon dioxide is demonstrated by comparing the effects in two separate vessels containing air and carbon dioxide respectively.

Type of Activity

:
demonstration

Audience

:
Teacher

Age Group

:
11 to 18 years

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
the-greenhouse-effect



Apparatus Chemicals

For both parts:

Photoflood light bulb, 275 W, in a plain bulb holder (Notes 1 & 2)

Temperature sensors with leads, 3, with data logger and computer display (Note 3)

For part 1:

Plastic drink bottles, transparent (1 dm3), 2
(Note 4)

2-hole bungs, to fit bottles (Note 4)

Clock, with second hand

Stand, boss and clamp, 2

For part 2:

Beakers (250 cm3), 2

Black card discs, 2

For part 1:

Lead foil pieces (TOXIC, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT), about 3 cm x 2 cm, 3

*Aluminium foil can be used as an alternative to lead foil but must be either painted black or darkened which happens after it has been in contact with food*

Matt black paint (for example, blackboard paint)

For part 2:

Source of carbon dioxide gas

(Optional) One or more of these other gases and volatile liquids:

Methane (natural gas) (EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE)

Pentane (EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE, HARMFUL,
DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT), 1 cm3

Hexane (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, HARMFUL,
DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT), 1 cm3

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 


 

  





2016



 

 

 


The demonstration is in two parts. In the first, the greenhouse effect in a greenhouse is modelled using transparent bottles containing air. In the second part, the role of carbon dioxide is demonstrated by comparing the effects in two separate vessels containing air and carbon dioxide respectively.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology .