Liquefying chlorine gas

Description

In this experiment, gaseous chlorine is liquefied by passing it over a 'cold finger' conderser cooled using a dry ice/ethanol mixture.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
liquefying-chlorine-gas

 


 


Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

Access to a fume cupboard

Protective gloves - for handling pellets of dry ice (-78 oC). Tongs or insulating (not rubber) gloves should be used

Chlorine generator (Note 1)

‘Cold finger' condenser (Note 2)

Bosses, clamps and stands

Optional:

Boiling tube with cotton wool plug

Test-tube holder

Beaker (100 cm3)

Bunsen burner

Sodium chlorate(I) solution, 14% (w/v) available chlorine (CORROSIVE) about 100 cm3 (also known as Sodium hypochlorite)

Hydrochloric acid, 5M (CORROSIVE) about 50 cm3

Ethanol (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE) or industrial denatured alcohol (IDA) (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, HARMFUL) about 20 cm3

A few small pellets of dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) (Can cause serious frostbite if handled without tongs or suitable gloves)

Optional:

Crushed ice - about 100 cm3

Sodium chloride – crushed rocksalt will do, about 100 g .

Bromine liquid (VERY TOXIC, CORROSIVE, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT), use a sealed ampoule

Iodine (HARMFUL, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT), a few crystals

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 


Read our standard health & safety guidance

Generation, collecting and testing gases

 


 




In this experiment, gaseous chlorine is liquefied by passing it over a 'cold finger' conderser cooled using a dry ice/ethanol mixture.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.