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Recovering pure water from a solution using a water condenser

Description

When copper sulfate solution is boiled pure water vapour is produced, which is then condensed to a liquid of boiling point 100°C.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
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Demonstration

When copper sulfate solution is boiled, pure water vapour is produced. This is then condensed in a water-cooled condenser to liquid water with a boiling point of 100°C.


(This experiment follows on from Recovering water from copper(II) sulfate solution)

It is best done as a demonstration which would take about 15 minutes (not including assembling the apparatus).

Apparatus Chemicals

Distillation flask (at least 100 cm3 capacity)

Water-cooled (Liebig) condenser and connection tubing to tap and sink

Corks or bungs to assemble apparatus (or use Quickfit apparatus)

Thermometer (-10° to +110 °C)

Stand, boss and clamp, 2

Bunsen burner

Tripod and gauze

Heat resistant mat

Beaker (100 cm3)

Anti-bumping granules (or pumice stone, or pieces of broken porcelain)

Copper(II) sulfate(VI) solution, 1 M (HARMFUL, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT), 30 cm3

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 



 





When copper sulfate solution is boiled pure water vapour is produced, which is then condensed to a liquid of boiling point 100oC.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.