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Which substances conduct electricity?

Description

This experiment enables students to distinguish between electrolytes and non-electrolytes.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
which-substances-conduct-...



Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

Each working group requires:

Carbon (graphite) electrodes fitted in a holder (Note 1)

Bunsen burner

Tripod

Pipe-clay triangle

Heat resistant mat

Clamp and stand

Small pieces of emery paper

Connecting leads and crocodile clips

Six-volt DC power pack

Six-volt light bulb in holder (Note 2)

Small pieces of lead (TOXIC), copper and perhaps other metals

Crucibles containing samples of:

Phenylsalicylate (salol) (IRRITANT, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT)

Polythene

Wax

Sugar

Zinc chloride (CORROSIVE, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT)

Potassium iodide

Sulfur (optional)

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 



Part 1

student sheet 





This experiment enables students to distinguish between electrolytes and non-electrolytes.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.