RSC - Advancing the Chemical Sciences


 

Places of Chemistry


Home screen app
Ever wondered about the history hidden behind the streets you walk every day? 

Chemistry is everywhere, you just need to know where and what to look for. Find out more about hundreds of places and explore the history of chemistry around you.

Places of Chemistry is a FREE app by the Royal Society of Chemistry which enables you to discover the location and story behind famous chemistry landmarks. 

  • Where was penicillin discovered? 
  • Where was Michael Faraday an apprentice? 
  • Who was the first company to supply London with Gas?       

Use this easy and informative tool to find out more and plan your visit to key chemistry heritage locations.

Places of Chemistry is the perfect travel companion for those interested in finding out more about the history hidden in the places around them. 

Stepping into history you'll be able to explore the chemistry that surrounds us finding out where scientists were born, lived, died and where they made ground breaking discoveries and navigate your way around 400 years of chemical history.

Download this free app from the Apple store and Google Play store. 

If you have suggestion for new places, please send an email to submitaplace (or via the app) specifying details of the place (including the location and images) and the reason why the place is important for the history of chemistry.


Related Links

Link icon Google Play store
Download Places of Chemistry

Link icon Places of Chemistry on Apple Store
Download Places of Chemistry


External links will open in a new browser window



Contact and Further Information

submitaplace
Specify details of the place (including the location and images) and the reason why the place is important for the history of chemistry





Chiara Ceci
Communications Executive
Royal Society of Chemistry, Thomas Graham House, Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0WF
Tel: +44 (0)1223 432492





Link icon Places of Chemistry on Apple Store
Download Places of Chemistry