2018 Centenary Prize Winner


Professor Jacqueline Barton
Professor Jacqueline Barton
California Institute of Technology

 

Awarded for the discovery of long-range DNA-mediated charge transport

 


About the Winner


Dr. Jacqueline K. Barton is the John G. Kirkwood and Arthur A. Noyes Professor of Chemistry and Norman Davidson Leadership Chair of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. Barton was awarded the A.B. at Barnard College and a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry at Columbia University. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Bell Laboratories and Yale University, she became an assistant professor at Hunter College, City University of New York. Soon after, she returned to Columbia University, becoming a professor of chemistry after three years (1986). In the fall of 1989, she joined the faculty at Caltech, and in 2009, she began her term as Chair of the Division. 

Professor Barton has pioneered the application of transition metal complexes to probe recognition and reactions of double helical DNA. In particular, she has carried out studies to elucidate electron transfer chemistry mediated by the DNA double helix. Through this research, Barton has trained more than 100 graduate students and postdoctoral students. She has received many awards. These include the NSF Alan T. Waterman Award, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship. She has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences, along with an honorary fellowship in the Royal Society of Chemistry. In 2011, Dr. Barton received the 2010 National Medal of Science from President Obama, and in 2015, she received the ACS Priestley Medal.


Related Links

Link icon Professor Barton's Webpage
California Institute of Technology


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