2018 Dalton Emerging Researcher Winner


Dr Conrad Goodwin
Dr Conrad Goodwin
The University of Manchester

 

Awarded for the development of synthetic routes to unprecedented magnetic molecules.

 


About the Winner


Conrad was born in Hampshire, UK in 1991 and later attended Salesian College Farnborough before moving north to Manchester. He did his undergraduate (MChem) at the University of Manchester with a final year project in the group of Dr. Michael Ingleson studying boron chemistry, which piqued his interest in air sensitive chemistry. He continued at UoM to study a PhD with Dr. David Mills as his first PhD student. As a young research group we had the ambitious task to "make cool molecules" that "have no right to exist", a guiding principal that Conrad has lived by ever since. 

Conrad's PhD focussed on the synthesis of f-element silylamide complexes. These are bulky ligands that we have used to make unprecedentedly low coordination numbers, and interesting geometries across the f-block with key results being the synthesis of the first near-linear f-block complex, and the first trigonal planar actinide complex. 

This work in collaboration with Dr. Nicholas Chilton and Prof. Richard Winpenny at UoM drove his research into the field of Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs), where people have worked for decades to make single molecules that can function as magnets at useful temperatures. The latest landmark result in this field was the synthesis of a "dysprosocenium cation", [Dy(Cpttt)2][B(C6F5)4] (Cpttt = {C5H2(tBu)3}) which functions at an unprecedented 60 K (the previous record of 14 K had stood for over a decade), and was published in Nature. This complex consists of two Cp rings which sandwich the central Dy atom, and by virtue of their steric bulk prevents any other metal interactions with neighbouring units. This unique structure prevents magnetic relaxation of the Dy atom all the way to 60 K. 


Related Links

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The University of Manchester


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