John B Goodenough Award 2017 Winner


Professor Stephen Elliott
Professor Stephen Elliott
University of Cambridge

 

Awarded for his distinguished contributions to the science of disordered materials when applied to chalcogenide glasses and phase-change materials for industry

 

 


About the Winner


Stephen Elliott went up to Trinity College, Cambridge in 1971 to read Natural Sciences, graduating in Theoretical Physics. He stayed on at the Cavendish Laboratory for a PhD on the subject of amorphous arsenic, under the supervision of Professor Edward Davis, and interacted with Professor Nevill Mott during this time. He was awarded a Prize (Junior Research) Fellowship by Trinity in 1977 and started his postdoctoral work on chalcogenide glasses at the Cavendish. During this time, he spent a year working at the then Royal Signals and Radar Establishment at Malvern on zinc-sulphide electroluminescent displays. In 1979, he obtained a University Demonstratorship at Cambridge in the then Department of Physical Chemistry (merging a few years later with the separate Department of Chemistry to form the present Department). He has stayed in this Department ever since, becoming University Lecturer in 1984, Reader in 1994 and Professor of Chemical Physics in 1999. From 1998 to 2000, he was also Professor of Physics at the Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France. He is a Professorial Fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge.

His research involves (ab initio) computer simulation, combined with experiment, on a variety of themes. Structure-property characteristics of disordered materials, including chalcogenide glasses, are studied, recently including 'phase-change' resistive random-access memory materials based on tellurides, which can be used as a replacement technology for non-volatile flash memory, as well as for neuromorphic ('brain-like') computing (artificial synapses). His research also includes the development of a variety of (bio-)chemical-sensor platforms based on optical waveguides and microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices, mainly for medical-diagnostic applications. He is also interested in developing optical-spectroscopic techniques for the non-destructive analysis of art-works; he co-founded MINIARE (Manuscript Illumination: Non-Invasive Analysis, Research and Expertise) with the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge.

He has been awarded a number of prizes and awards for his work: the W.H. Zachariasen Prize (1992), the Stanford R. Ovshinsky Award for excellence in non-crystalline chalcogenides (2001) (inaugural award), the Chancellor's Medal, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic (2012), and the G.W. Morey Award (2013) from the American Ceramic Society.


Related Links

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University of Cambridge


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