RSC Publishing


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RSC Advances


1.0 Scope and Standards

RSC Advances is an international, peer-reviewed, online journal covering all of the chemical sciences, including speciality and interdisciplinary fields. The criteria for publication will be that the experimental work must be high quality, well conducted and adds to the development of the field. Articles submitted to the journal will be evaluated by international referees for the overall quality and accuracy of the science presented.

 

2.0 Article types

2.1 Communications  These must report preliminary research findings that are original and of immediate interest. Communications are given priority treatment, and are fast-tracked through the publication process. Ideally, a Paper in RSC Advances should follow each Communication.

2.2 Papers  These must describe science that will be of benefit to the community and are judged according to originality, quality of scientific content and contribution to existing knowledge. Although there is no page limit for Papers, appropriateness of length to content of new science will be taken into consideration.

2.3 Reviews Potential writers should contact the Editorial Office before embarking on their work.

 

3.0 Supporting Information 

Experimental information must be provided to enable other researchers to accurately reproduce the work. Figures should include error bars where appropriate, and results should be accompanied by analyses of experimental uncertainty. The experimental details and the characterisation data should preferably be provided as Electronic Supplementary Information although on occasion it may be appropriate to include some or all of this within the body of the article. This will depend on the nature of the research being reported.

3.1 Characterisation of new compounds 
It is the responsibility of authors to provide fully convincing evidence for the homogeneity, purity and identity of all compounds they claim as new. This evidence is required to establish that the properties and constants reported are those of the compound with the new structure claimed. Referees will assess, as a whole, the evidence presented in support of the claims made by the authors. The requirements for characterisation criteria are detailed below.

3.1.1 Organic Compounds 
Authors are required to provide unequivocal support for the purity and assigned structure of all compounds using a combination of the following characterization techniques: Analytical. Elemental analysis (within ±0.4% of the calculated value) is required to confirm 95% sample purity and corroborate isomeric purity. Authors are also encouraged to provide copies of 1H/13C-NMR spectra and/or GC/HPLC traces. If satisfactory elemental analysis cannot be obtained copies of these spectra and/or traces must be provided. For libraries of compounds, HPLC traces should be submitted as proof of purity. The determination of enantiomeric excess of nonracemic, chiral substances should be supported with either SFC/GC/HPLC traces with retention times for both enantiomers and separation conditions (i.e. chiral support, solvent and flow rate) or for Mosher Ester/Chiral Shift Reagent analysis, copies of the spectra. Physical: Important physical properties, for example, boiling or melting point, specific rotation, refractive index, etc., including conditions and a comparison to the literature for known compounds should be provided. For crystalline compounds, the method used for recrystallization should also be documented (i.e. solvent etc.). Spectroscopic: Mass spectra and a complete numerical listing of 1H/13C-NMR peaks in support of the assigned structure, including relevant 2D NMR and related experiments (i.e. NOE, etc.) is required. Authors are encouraged to provide copies of these spectra. Infra Red spectra that support functional group modifications, including other diagnostic assignments should be included. High-resolution mass spectra are acceptable as proof of the molecular weight provided the purity of the sample has been accurately determined as outlined above. The synthesis of all new compounds must be described in detail. Synthetic procedures must include the specific reagents, products and solvents and must give the amounts (g, mmol, for products: %) for all of them, as well as clearly stating how the percentage yields are calculated. They must include the 1H, 13C and MS data of this specific compound. For multistep synthesis papers: spectra of key compounds and of the final product should be included. For a series of related compounds at least one representative procedure which outlines a specific example that is described in the text or in a table and which is representative for the other cases must be provided.

3.1.2 Polymers 
For all soluble polymers an estimation of molecular weight must be provided by a suitable method, e.g. size exclusion chromatography, including details of columns, eluents and calibration standards, intrinsic viscosity, MALDI TOF, etc. in addition to full NMR characterization (1H, 13C) as for organic compound characterization-see above. The synthesis of all new compounds must be described in detail. Synthetic procedures must include the specific reagents, products and solvents and must give the amounts (g, mmol, for products: %) for all of them, as well as clearly stating how the percentage yields are calculated. They must also include all the characterisation data for the prepared compound or material. For a series of related compounds at least one representative procedure which outlines a specific example that is described in the text or in a table and which is representative for the other cases must be provided.

3.1.3 Inorganic and Organometallic compounds 
A new chemical substance (molecule or extended solid) should have a homogeneous composition and structure. New chemical syntheses must unequivocally establish the purity and identity of these materials. Where the compound is molecular, minimum standards have been established. For manuscripts that report new compounds or materials, data must be provided to unequivocally establish the homogeneity, purity and identification of these substances. In general, this should include elemental analyses that agree to within ±0.4% of the calculated values. In cases where elemental analyses cannot be obtained (e.g. for thermally unstable compounds), justification for the omission of this data should be provided. Note that an X-ray crystal structure is not sufficient for the characterization of a new material, since the crystal used in this analysis does not necessarily represent the bulk sample. In rare cases, it may be possible to substitute elemental analyses with high-resolution mass spectrometric molecular weights. This is appropriate, for example, with trivial derivatives of thoroughly characterized substances or routine synthetic intermediates. In all cases, relevant spectroscopic data (NMR, IR, UV-vis, etc.) should be provided in tabulated form or as reproduced spectra. Again, these may be more appropriate for the Supplementary Information. However, it should be noted that in general mass spectrometric and spectroscopic data do not constitute proof of purity, and in the absence of elemental analyses additional evidence of purity should be provided (melting points, PXRD data, etc.). Experimental data for new substances should also include synthetic yields, reported in terms of grams or moles, and as a percentage. Where the compound is an extended solid it is important to unequivocally establish the chemical structure and bulk composition. Single crystal diffraction does not determine the bulk structure. Referees will normally look to see evidence of bulk homogeneity. A fully indexed powder diffraction pattern which agrees with single crystal data may be used as evidence of a bulk homogeneous structure and chemical analysis may be used to establish purity and homogeneous composition. The synthesis of all new compounds must be described in detail. Synthetic procedures must include the specific reagents, products and solvents and must give the amounts (g, mmol, for products: %) for all of them, as well as clearly stating how the percentage yields are calculated. They must also include all the characterisation data for the prepared compound or material. For a series of related compounds at least one representative procedure which outlines a specific example that is described in the text or in a table and which is representative for the other cases must be provided. 

3.1.4 Nano-sized materials (e.g. quantum dots, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires) 
For nano-sized materials it is essential that the authors not only provide detailed characterisation on individual objects (see above) but also a comprehensive characterisation of the bulk composition. Characterisation of the bulk of the sample could require determination of the chemical composition and size distribution over large portions of the sample. The synthesis of all new compounds must be described in detail. Synthetic procedures must include the specific reagents, products and solvents and must give the amounts (g, mmol, for products: %) for all of them, as well as clearly stating how the percentage yields are calculated. They must also include all the characterisation data for the prepared compound or material. For a series of related compounds at least one representative procedure which outlines a specific example that is described in the text or in a table and which is representative for the other cases must be provided. 

3.1.5 Biomolecules (e.g. enzymes, proteins, DNA/RNA, oligosaccharides, oligonucleotides)
Authors should provide rigorous evidence for the identity and purity of the biomolecules described. The techniques that may be employed to substantiate identity include mass spectrometry, LC-MS, sequencing data (for proteins and oligonucleotides), high field 1-H or 13-C NMR, X-ray crystallography. Purity must be established by one or more of the following: HPLC, gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, high field 1-H or 13-C NMR. Sequence verification also needs to be carried out for nucleic acid cases involving molecular biology. For organic synthesis involving DNA, RNA oligonucleotides, their derivatives or mimics, purity must be established using HPLC and mass spectrometry as a minimum. For new derivatives comprising modified monomers, the usual organic chemistry analytical requirements for the novel monomer must be provided (see 3.1.1. Organic Compounds). It is not however necessary to provide this level of characterisation for the oligonucleotide into which the novel monomer is incorporated.

3.2 General 
It is the responsibility of the author(s) to provide the reviewers with the necessary information to evaluate the merit of the manuscript in terms of its scientific content. Failure to provide the necessary experimental evidence and data may result in the manuscript being withdrawn by the Editor.