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Exothermic or endothermic?

Description

Some reactions give out heat and others take in heat. In exothermic reactions the temperature goes up, in endothermic reactions the temperature goes down. In this experiment, various reactions are examined. Temperatures are measured to decide whether a particular reaction is exothermic or endothermic.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
exothermic-or-endothermic



Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

Each group of students will need:

Polystyrene cup (expanded polystyrene)

Beaker (250 cm3) in which to stand the polystyrene cup for support (Note 1)

Thermometer (–10°C to 110°C)

Measuring cylinder (10 cm3), 2

Spatula

Absorbent paper

Access to the following solutions (all at approx 0.4 M concentration):

Copper(II) sulfate

Hydrochloric acid

Sodium hydrogencarbonate

Sodium hydroxide (IRRITANT)

Sulfuric acid

Access to the following solids:

Magnesium ribbon, cut into 3 cm lengths

Magnesium powder (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE)

Citric acid (IRRITANT)

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 







 




Some reactions give out heat and others take in heat. In exothermic reactions the temperature goes up, in endothermic reactions the temperature goes down. In this experiment, various reactions are examined. Temperatures are measured to decide whether a particular reaction is exothermic or endothermic.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.

The experiment is also part of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Continuing Professional Development course: Chemistry for non-specialists