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Iron and sulfur reaction

Description

This demonstration or class experiment shows the exothermic reaction of two elements, iron and sulfur, to form the compound, iron sulfide. The two solids are mixed and heated in a test-tube (or ignition tube). The reaction can be used to illustrate elements, mixtures and compounds.

Type of Activity

:
demonstration, class practical

Audience

:
Teacher

Age Group

:
11 to 16 years

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
iron-and-sulfur-reaction



Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

Balance (1 or 2 d.p.)

For the demonstration the teacher will need:

Test-tube made from borosilicate glass (e.g. Pyrex)

Bunsen burner

Heat resistant mat

Clamp stand and clamp

Spatulas, 2

Small bar magnet

Watch glass

Filter paper, 2 pieces (or use 2 weighing boats)

Mineral wool (or mineral fibre)

For the class practical each group of students will need:

Prepared ignition tube (Note 1)

Bunsen burner

Heat resistant mat

Test-tube tongs

Iron powder (potential IRRITANT)

Sulfur – finely powdered roll or flowers

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 






This demonstration or class experiment shows the exothermic reaction of two elements, iron and sulfur, to form the compound, iron sulfide. The two solids are mixed and heated in a test-tube (or ignition tube). The reaction can be used to illustrate elements, mixtures and compounds.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.

The experiment is also part of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Continuing Professional Development course: Chemistry for non-specialists