Heating Group 1 metals in air and in chlorine

Description

This is a demonstration that shows the reactions of Group 1 metals in air and in chlorine.  It does not clearly show the trends in reactivity of Group 1 metals, which are better demonstrated by the reactions in water, which follow on well from this demonstration.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
heating-group-1-metals-in...



Apparatus Chemicals

Goggles for the demonstrator, eye protection for the audience

Fume cupboard (only for generating the chlorine)

Clean, dry bricks with at least one flat surface, 3 (Note 1)

Gas jars with lids, 3 (Note 1)

Bunsen burner

Heat resistant mat

Scalpel

Forceps or tweezers

Tile

Filter paper

Universal Indicator paper

Chlorine generator (TOXIC, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT) See Standard Techniques: Generating, collecting and testing gases (Note 2)

Lithium (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, CORROSIVE) (Note 3 and 4)

Sodium (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, CORROSIVE) (Note 3)

Potassium (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, CORROSIVE) (Note 3)

Sodium chlorate(I) solution (also called sodium hypochlorite), 10-14% (w/v) (CORROSIVE), fresh (Note 2)

Hydrochloric acid, 5M (IRRITANT AT THIS DILUTION) (Note 2)

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 





 




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This is a demonstration that shows the reactions of Group 1 metals in air and in chlorine.  It does not clearly show the trends in reactivity of Group 1 metals, which are better demonstrated by the reactions in water, which follow on well from this demonstration.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.

The experiment is also part of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Continuing Professional Development course: Chemistry for non-specialists