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Reactions of halogens (as aqueous solutions)

Description

This experiment compares the colours of three halogens in aqueous solution and in a non-polar solvent. These halogens also react to a small extent with water, forming acidic solutions with bleaching properties.

Type of Activity

:
demonstration, class practical

Audience

:
Teacher

Age Group

:
14 to 18 years

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
reactions-of-halogens-as-...


Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

One demonstration or one group of students requires:

Test-tube rack, to hold 10 test-tubes

Test-tubes, 10

Cork or rubber bungs to fit, 4

Plastic dropping pipettes, 6

White spotting tile

White tile

Glass rod

Paper towel or tissue

About 10 cm3 of each of the following halogen solutions in stoppered test-tubes (Notes 1 and 2):

Chlorine water, 0.1% (w/v) (HARMFUL)

Bromine water, 0.1% (w/v) (HARMFUL)

Iodine solution, 0.1 M

Half a test-tube of 0.1 M solutions of each of the following:

Potassium chloride

Potassium bromide

Potassium iodide

Universal Indicator paper (about 2 cm strips), 3

Optional:

Cyclohexane (HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, HARMFUL, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT) or other suitable non-polar solvent, about 10 cm3(Note 1)

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 



 




 

 



Page last updated October 2015

This experiment compares the colours of three halogens in aqueous solution and in a non-polar solvent. These halogens also react to a small extent with water, forming acidic solutions with bleaching properties.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.

The experiment is also part of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Continuing Professional Development course: Chemistry for non-specialists