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Making an alloy (solder)

Description

Solder can be made by heating together the metals lead and tin. The hardness, melting point and density of the alloy can be compared to lead.

Credits

:
This is an experiment from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry.
making-an-alloy-solder



Apparatus Chemicals

Eye protection

Thermal protection gloves

Each working group requires:

Crucible

Pipe clay triangle

Bunsen burner

Tripod

Heat resistant mat

Spatula

Tongs (Note 1)

Casting sand (Note 2)

Metal sand trays or sturdy metal lids, 2 (Note 2)

Balance (no decimal places needed)

Access to:

Lead (TOXIC, DANGEROUS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT), about 2 g

Tin, about 2 g

Carbon powder, about 2 g

Refer to Health & Safety and Technical notes section below for additional information.

 

 


Read our standard health & safety guidance

 




 




 


Solder can be made by heating together the metals lead and tin. The hardness, melting point and density of the alloy can be compared to lead.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is a resource from the Practical Chemistry project, developed by the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. This collection of over 200 practical activities demonstrates a wide range of chemical concepts and processes. Each activity contains comprehensive information for teachers and technicians, including full technical notes and step-by-step procedures. Practical Chemistry activities accompany Practical Physics and Practical Biology.