2019 John B Goodenough Award Winner


Professor Clare Grey

Professor Clare Grey
Image courtesy of Nathan Pitt, University of Cambridge

University of Cambridge

 

Awarded for pioneering and innovative uses of magnetic resonance methods to study structure and dynamics in electrochemical devices.

 

 

 

 

 


About the Winner


Clare P. Grey, FRS is the Geoffrey Moorhouse-Gibson Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge University and a Fellow of Pembroke College Cambridge.  She received a BA and D. Phil. (1991) in Chemistry from the University of Oxford.  After post-doctoral fellowships in the Netherlands and at DuPont CR&D in Wilmington, DE, joined the faculty at Stony Brook University (SBU) as an Assistant (1994), Associate (1997) and then Full Professor (2001-2015).  She moved to Cambridge in 2009, maintaining an adjunct position at SBU.  She was the director of the Northeastern Chemical Energy Storage Center, a Department of Energy, Energy Frontier Research Center (2009-2010) and Associate director (2011-2014).  She is currently the director of the EPSRC Centre for Advanced Materials for Integrated Energy Systems (CAM-IES). Her recent honours and awards include the 2011 Royal Society Kavli Lecture and Medal for work relating to the Environment/Energy, Honorary PhD Degrees from the Universities of Orleans (2012) and Lancaster (2013), the Gunther Laukien Award from the Experimental NMR Conference (2013), the Research Award from the International Battery Association (2013), the Royal Society Davy Award (2014), the Arfvedson-Schlenk-Preis from the German Chemical Society (2015), the Société Chimique de France, French-British Prize (2017), the Solid State Ionics Galvani-Nernst-Wagner Mid-Career Award (2017), a Royal Society Research Professorship (2018), the Sacconi Medal from the Italian Chemical Society (2018) and the Eastern Analytical Symposium Award for Outstanding Achievements in Magnetic Resonance (2018). She is a foreign member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2017), a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society (2017) and a member of Academia Europa (2017-). Her current research interests include the use of solid state NMR and diffraction-based methods to determine structure-function relationships in materials for energy storage (batteries and supercapacitors), conversion (fuel cells) and carbon capture.


Related Links

Link icon Clare Grey's Webpage
University of Cambridge


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